News

State Legislative Matrix

Track EBHO's Work in the State Capitol

Capitol Building MG 1600 Sans watermark 640

There are a number of exciting housing bills currently in the California state legislature and EBHO is working hard to see legislation passed that will increase access, support and funding for affordable housing in California. You can follow this work through our Legislative Matrix, which details all the bills we are tracking, where they stand in the legislative process, and how EBHO is working on them. To learn more about EBHO's legislative work, contact policy director This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

The California Legislature can create significant opportunities towards our goal of creating, preserving and protecting affordable housing both statewide and locally in the 2017 legislative session. The governor's draft budget, released January 10, 2017, and with the possibility of a future deficit and federal cuts, the governor does not want to provide a general fund allocation toward programs for construction and preservation of affordable homes.

Now more than ever, we need laws that support affordable housing in California. With your support, we want to see these bills pass. We can make this a reality if we stand together for housing justice. 

 

Guide to EBHO priority bills

2017 State Housing Legislation

 For additional information visit: The NPH State Legislative Resource Page or Housing California's State Legislation Resource Page for frequently asked questions and budget asks

 

2017 Supported Bills

AB 72 Fair Housing Enforcement

Problem: The need to build more housing in California has skyrocketed over the last decade, especially following the development slow down after the country’s most recent recession. 

Solution: By appropriating additional funds to the Attorney General for enforcement duties, AB 72 will be an important step towards ensuring the continued construction of fair and equitable affordable housing across California.

Lead Advocate: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

AB 423: Residential Hotel Protections (Bonta):

Ellis Act Exemption for SROs in Oakland. This bill would protect one of Oakland's most vulnerable communities that live in what are commonly referred to as residential or single-room occupancy (SRO) hotels by giving the City of Oakland the ability to regulate and protects SRO residents from eviction. 

Solution: AB 423 Extends existing SRO exemption from Ellis Act for buildings in Oakland.  Current law only covers SF, LA, San Diego, San Jose. It would also remove legal obstacles to stronger SRO preservation in Oakland.

Our Position: Support

Lead Advocate: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

SB 3: Affordable Housing Bond Act of 2018 (Beall)

Problem: One of the biggest challenges faced by affordable developers is the lack of funding to build affordable apartments. In just the past 8 years, public investment in affordable development has plummeted 66 percent -- including more than $1 billion/year that vanished when California's redevelopment agencies were dissolved.

Solution: SB 3 would enact the Affordable Housing Bond Act of 2018, would authorize the issuance of bonds in the amount of $3 billion. Proceeds would be used to finance various existing housing programs, as well as infill infrastructure financing and affordable-development matching grant programs.

Lead Advocate: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

2017 Endorsed Priorities

 

AB 74: Housing for a Healthy California (Chiu)

Problem: Homelessness often creates a circuit, where those experiencing it long enough cycle through living on the streets, emergency rooms, hospital stays, jails, and nursing homes. This circuit is expensive to our public systems. Individuals experiencing homelessness cost our public systems an average of $2,897 per month, two-thirds of which is incurred through the health system.  Although these individuals may receive medical and social services, without the stability of housing, they're usually unable to follow regimens and make choices that make services effective.

Solution: AB 74, identical to the 2016 bill AB 2821, creates a Rental Assistance Program that would allow thousands of Californians to exit the cycle of homelessness (and this "circuit") by linking services with housing. Housing gives people the stability to stick to a medical regimen, keep in contact with a primary care doctor, and live a healthy lifestyle that will help keep them housed and reduce the expensive costs to our public systems. AB 74 goes one step further, by collecting data to track costs and benefits of moving a person from the street into housing.

Our Position: Support

Lead Advocate: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Fact Sheet

Sample Support Letter

 

AB 71: Bring California Home Act (Chiu)

Problem:  The largest investment that the state makes on housing is through the mortgage interest deduction. Yet, the mortgage interest deduction disproportionately benefits those with higher incomes and larger mortgages, and can be used for second and vacation homes. To qualify for a mortgage interest deduction, a taxpayer must itemize deductions, which low- and moderate- income homeowners typically do not do. The estimated impact of the vacation home mortgage interest deduction on the general fund was $360 million in 2016-17. 

Solution: AB 71 provides an ongoing state funding source for affordable housing by eliminating the state mortgage interest deduction on vacation homes. This deduction results in a revenue loss to the state of approximately $300 million annually.  The funds saved as a result of eliminating the deduction would then increase the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program by $300 million per year.

Our position: Sponsor and support

Lead advocate:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Fact Sheet

Sample Support Letter

 

SB 2: Building Homes and Jobs Act (Atkins)

Problem:  Increased and ongoing public funding for affordable homes -- for rentals and homeownership -- is critical to stabilize the state during the greatest housing crisis faced by typical California families. If developers know that there is a sustainable source of funding, they will take on the risk that comes with development — and create a reliable pipeline of well-paying construction jobs in the process.

Solution: SB 2 would enact the Building Homes and Jobs Act, generating hundreds of millions of dollars annually for affordable housing through a $75 fee (capped at $225) on real estate recorded documents, excluding those documents associated with real estate sales. 50% of collected fees will be distributed directly to local governments to address local needs. The remainder will be allocated by the state on a competitive basis. 20% of overall funds must be allocated to affordable homeownership needs for a growing workforce and 10% of overall funds must be used to meet the affordable housing needs of farmworkers and their families.This Act would ensure a sustainable, ongoing infusion of funds into tried-and-true programs.

Our position: Sponsor and support

Lead advocate:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Fact Sheet

Sample Support Letter

 

SB 3: Affordable Housing Bond Act of 2018 (Beall)

Problem: One of the biggest challenges faced by affordable developers is the lack of funding to build affordable apartments. In just the past 8 years, public investment in affordable development has plummeted 66 percent -- including more than $1 billion/year that vanished when California's redevelopment agencies were dissolved.

Solution: SB 3 would enact the Affordable Housing Bond Act of 2018, would authorize the issuance of bonds in the amount of $3 billion. Proceeds would be used to finance various existing housing programs, as well as infill infrastructure financing and affordable-development matching grant programs.

Lead advocate: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

AB 1505: Inclusionary Zoning (Bloom)

 

Problem: Local governments have lost a vital tool to address the lack of affordable rental homes, especially in high-opportunity neighborhoods, effectively excluding people with low incomes. Families who would otherwise have access to opportunity and be able to lift themselves out of poverty remain held down, without access to good schools, jobs, and healthy communities.

Solution: This bill would authorize a city, county, or city and county to adopt ordinances to require, as a condition of development of residential rental homes, that the development include a certain percentage of affordable rental homes.

Our Position: Sponsor and support

Lead advocate: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

2017 Supported Bills

 

AB 181: Renters' Credit (Lackey):

This bill increases the renters’ credit from $120 to $240 for married couples filing joint returns, heads of household, and surviving spouses if adjusted gross income is $100,000 or less (increase from $50,000).  This bill increases the renters’ credit from $60 to $120 for individuals if adjusted gross income is $50,000 or less (up from $25,000).